Guitarlington 2015 – The 4 Amigos Guitar Show in Arlington Texas

Last weekend, I displayed my amps at my first guitar show.  Besides the obvious marketing aspects, I met some great people there.  Although lots of vendors had amps, especially vintage amps, I was surprised that there were only a few other amp vendors there.  There were many choice pieces there, including some ’57-59 tweed Fender Bassman amps.

Daniel manning the Texas Tone booth

Daniel manning the Texas Tone booth

One of the amp vendors was Brown Amplification from McKinney, Texas.  They make heads and speaker cabinets, but not combos.  Since I only make combos, I sent them folks looking for heads and they sent folks to me looking for combos.

The first folks I met were the team from Wathen Audiophile. They make some really choice speakers and amps, but they were mainly displaying their select line of preamp and power amp tubes, all cryogenically treated with their proprietary treatment and selected to their own very strict specifications.  Each individually serialized tube includes its own laboratory test report for Heater vol, Plate vol, Screen vol, Grid vol, Transconductance, Grid Leakage, Plate Current, Plate Resistance and Gain. They were kind enough to supply me with a 12AX7-WCM that I used Sunday afternoon in my Texas 2:10 Special in the V1 preamp stage.  That amp got rave reviews (more on that later).

In the booth next to ours, between us and Warthen, was RBi Music, featuring FRET-King guitars by Trev Wilkinson . I use the Wilkinson compensating brass saddle Tele bridge on my guitar.  I really like those guitars, especially their JD Duncan Jerry Donahue model (my personal favorite) and a beautiful Elise semi-hollow model.  Rick Taylor and I got along well, and I let them test drive guitars on my amps, to our mutual benefit.

I had an interesting conversation about guitar amps and the music scene with Mark Daven of the Guitar Radio Show. Mark’s a great guy, and was nice enough to give me a shout out is his blog about Guitarlington 2015. Lauraine O’Toole from Avalon Multimedia dropped by for a visit and had some nice words for the Texas 2:10 Special.

I also got to meet Kevin Butts at Killer B Guitars.  I had to do this after Mark Daven brought a beautiful Killer B lefty T style guitar over to play through my amps. This guitar not only sounded great, but it was a work of art.  I had to tell the builder how impressed I was with his guitar.

The Texas 2:10 Special

I had three amps at the show – The original Texas Tone 12, the tweed Texas 2-Step, and the Texas 2:10 Special.

Daniel manning the Texas Tone booth

Daniel manning the Texas Tone booth

Although the tube tremolo on the Texas Tone 12 always warms my heart, and gets good response, on Saturday the Texas 2-Step got the most attention.  The ability to go from single-ended Champ to push-pull Deluxe circuits, and easily moving from clean to saturation, brought lots of positive response from listeners.

On Sunday, however, the Texas 2:10 Special was the star of the show.  Two incidents stand out.  A nice lady with a Tone Forge T-Shirt came by to get some brochures, and told me that the Texas 2:10 Special was the best amp in the show.  Late in the day, a very talented Nashville guitarist named Nathan came by, looking for the star amp.  He said he had heard about the amp (Texas 2:10 Special) and had come by to test it out.  He played and played on that amp, covering a variety of styles quite handily, all the while raving about the tone and responsiveness of the Texas 2:10 Special.  Rick from RBi let him play the JDD and Elise, but most of his playing was on my personal Telecaster.  He was most impressed with the amp, and I hope to get in touch with him again when he comes back to Austin.

All in all, it was a great time, and a great showing for my amps.  It’s always good to get feedback from musicians, and it’s extra special to get such positive response from people for whom music is their livelihood.

Bruce

Advertisements

Texas Tone 12 Public Debut

The Texas Tone 12 had its public debut last week, at an outdoor gig by Rosie and The Ramblers at Freddie’s Place in south Austin.  I was concerned thaTexas Tone 12t, being a small tweed type amplifier surrounded by a full band, it wouldn’t be able to produce enough volume. I was wrong in that concern.  Rosie and The Ramblers didn’t play at ear-splitting volume, but more of a listening level show.  Usually, each of the Ramblers’ two guitarists play through Fender Blues Junior amplifiers.  On this night, John Winsor had agreed to play the Texas Tone 12 after playing though it on a demo session several days earlier.  He still brought his Blues Junior just in case.

John set up the Texas Tone 12 on the stage next to Schley Barrack’s Blues Jr., and put the tremolo footswitch on his pedal board.  After a few minutes of tweaking and sound checks, the Ramblers were ready to go.  After the first song, which sounded very good, I asked them to turn up Rosie’s vocals. She’s an expressive singer with a strong voice, and I wanted that to come through the mix.

The Texas Tone 12 did more than hold its own. John and Schley, who both play Fender Telecasters, trade lead and rhythm parts, and sometimes play harmony lead lines.  Both are very good guitarists.  Schley handled the Albert Lee parts in Emmylou’s Luxury Liner just fine.  John sometimes keeps his leads on the mellow side, but occasionally lets that biting Tele twang come through.  Not only did the lead parts sing through the Texas Tone 12, but the rhythm parts didn’t get lost.

John was quickly able to find the amp’s ‘sweet spot’, which in this case had the volume on 12 and the gain at 6 or 7. At that setting, he could easily play clean or overdriven tones, depending upon his picking style and his guitar’s tone and volume settings.  According to John, “It is really responsive, breaks up nicely, and gives a great warm/slightly-compressed overdrive.”

Playing a mix of country standards and original material, the tonal response of the Texas Tone 12 shone throughout.  Winsor and Barrack were both impressed with the richness of the amp’s tremolo circuit.  Winsor again, “man, that tremolo sounds sweet! There were a couple of those ballads where Schley and I both heard it and gave the thumbs-up!” Rosie, also did not escape those sweet tremolo sounds.  After one of the songs, she said, “How did you like that!” with a smile and a nod of approval.

Overall, it was a good first outing.  John Winsor’s thoughts on the amp, “Your Texas Tone sounds great! I think it is an excellent amp… I wouldn’t change a thing about it.”